Concentration analysis (mg/kg)

0.0-1.0[1], 0.4-4.0[2], 0.0-50.0[3]

0.1-0.5[4], 0.0[5], nq-0.08[6]

MeSH classification

Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions. They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.

Agents that prevent clotting.

Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular hypertension regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are diuretics; (especially diuretics, thiazide), adrenergic beta-antagonists; adrenergic alpha-antagonists; angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; calcium channel blockers; ganglionic blockers and vasodilator agents.

Gastrointestinal agents that stimulate the flow of bile into the duodenum (cholagogues) or stimulate the production of bile by the liver (choleretic)

Substances that influence the course of a chemical reaction by ready combination with free radicals. Among other effects, this combining activity protects pancreatic islets against damage by cytokines and prevents myocardial and pulmonary perfusion injuries.

Substances used for the detection, identification, analysis, etc. of chemical, biological, or pathologic processes or conditions. Indicators are substances that change in physical appearance, e.g., color, at or approaching the endpoint of a chemical titration, e.g., on the passage between acidity and alkalinity. Reagents are substances used for the detection or determination of another substance by chemical or microscopical means, especially analysis. Types of reagents are precipitants, solvents, oxidizers, reducers, fluxes, and colorimetric reagents. (From Grant & Hackh’s Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed, p301, p499)

References

  1. Boskou, G., et al., Antioxidant capacity and phenolic profile of table olives from the Greek market. Food Chemistry, 2006. 94(4): p. 558-564.
  2. Bianco, A., et al., Analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry of biophenolic compounds in olives and vegetation waters, part I. Journal of Separation Science, 2003. 26(5): p. 409-416.
  3. Bianco, A. and N. Uccella, Biophenolic components of olives. Food Research International, 2000. 33(6): p. 475-485.
  4. Caponio, F., V. Alloggio, and T. Gomes, Phenolic compounds of virgin olive oil: influence of paste preparation techniques. Food Chemistry, 1999. 64(2): p. 203-209.
  5. Tuberoso, C.I.G., et al., Determination of antioxidant compounds and antioxidant activity in commercial oilseeds for food use. Food Chemistry, 2007. 103(4): p. 1494-1501.
  6. Ouni, Y., et al., Characterisation and quantification of phenolic compounds of extra-virgin olive oils according to their geographical origin by a rapid and resolutive LC-ESI-TOF MS method. Food Chemistry, 2011. 127(3): p. 1263-1267.